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The latest news on New York architecture.

Tin Pan Alley is once again making its way into the hearts of Americans now that plans to build a high rise in its place have fallen through. After the Tin Pan Alley was put up for sale in the fall of 2018 for $44 million, the plan to redevelop the area fell through due to economic turmoil. The historical value and landmark status of these buildings have pushed them back into the spotlight and ignited many New Yorkers' desire to preserve their culture.

American Culture Revisited

Tin Pan Alley initially began as an influential residential area and reinvented itself as the spot to set up shop in the entertainment or music industry. Many careers began on these streets some of whose efforts would go on to support Americans through two World Wars and several presidential terms. Thomas Edison's motion picture company even boasted an office on this iconic avenue. Printers, composers, singers, songwriters, and even journalists called this place home for years.

Notes of the Past

Throughout the late 1880s and into the 1950s our country's songwriters thrived in this community. Piano tunes and various broadcasts could be heard up and down the road competing for attention. Local journalists nicknamed the area Tin Pan Alley referencing the competing piano tunes throughout the day and night.

Tin Pan Alley’s musical history contains great songs such as "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" by Jack Norwood and "Give My Regards to Broadway" by George M. Cohan. These iconic pieces were penned within these buildings, and it seems fitting that preserving these buildings protects a rich history that is unique to the streets of New York and to the founders and artists of a bygone era.

A Win for the Tin

On March 12, 2019 the Landmarks Preservation Commission calendared five buildings on Tin Pan Alley; 47, 49, 51, 53 and 55 West 28th Street between Broadway and Sixth Ave. The Commission will research the history of these buildings and determine whether they will be eligible for landmark designation based on a combination of historical, cultural, and architectural significance.

Back in the Spotlight

The new focus on this area has presented the history of these remaining buildings in a unique, personal light for both the residents and New York City’s musical culture in general. Recognizing the value of these buildings and their place in history represents the core values of our city and our culture.

Contact Scott Henson Architect to learn more about the preservation, restoration, and repairs necessary to protect these landmarks and other buildings with significant historical value.

Published in Landmarks Preservation