The latest news on New York architecture.

  • Vintage Meets Modern: Linear vs Phased Construction

    Vintage Meets Modern: Linear vs Phased Construction

    The world we live in is obsessed with vintage meeting modern. A common hobby is often restoring antique items, and making them seemingly brand new. Few often ponder the work that goes into doing this, and sometimes chalk restoration up to simply being a new coat of paint. There is a whole process that goes into the preservation and restoration of historical buildings, however, and it is quite interesting. 

    Construction cannot simply be delved into, but instead, must be planned out first. This leads into the debate on linear versus phased construction. Essentially, which is the best for this project? Well, the answer is typically both when dealing the restoration of a historical building.

    Figuratively so, linear construction is traditional. This undergoes meticulous planning, and all of the bases get covered. It is a slower process, but it is important to remember that the original plans for a historical building were, in fact, slower, as well. Linear construction basically leaves little to no room for error, as everything is thoughtfully planned out. Of course, linear construction covers the vintage side of things quite nicely.

    Phased construction, on the other hand, is very fast-paced. The construction of a building has already started when the final phases are still being planned out. Basically, it is the execution of an idea, without the idea being completely finished. It is seemingly more risky, but is the most popular method in the construction world today. As you can tell, it is the modern aspect of the restoration of historical buildings.

    With all of this in mind, the argument of linear versus phased construction still stands. It is safe to say that, though, that choosing an expert on both types of construction, is essential. With over 25 years of experience, Scott Henson is the architectural expert you are looking for.

    Read more...
  • Filing Help for NYC Certificate of Occupancy

    Filing Help for NYC Certificate of Occupancy

    Are you considering making physical changes to your property that will change its type of occupancy or use? Or are you in the process of new construction on a building?  In New York, completing this type of construction means you will need an amended certificate of occupancy Certificate of Occupancy.

    Scott Henson Architect can file these certificates with the Department of Buildings for NYC building owners, in cases of both renovations and new construction.

    In order to get a Certificate of Occupancy, your building must be inspected by the Department of Buildings. The inspector will confirm that everything in the building was constructed in accordance with your architect's approved plans, including:

    • Plumbing 
    • Fire safety (sprinkler system, alarm, fire pump pressure test)
    • Electrical 
    • Elevators 
    • Lobby completion
    • Entrances (correct number for size; no obstructions)

    A Department of Buildings inspector will want to confirm that major construction is complete on the job site and that there are no safety hazards in the space, such as obstructions at the entrances or construction that would impede fire safety. According to city government,

    No one may legally occupy a building until the Department has issued a Certificate of Occupancy or Temporary Certificate of Occupancy.

    When a final Certificate of Occupancy is issued, this confirms that the construction on your building is compliant with all legal guidelines, including the filing of proper paperwork, fees, and approvals, and that any violations have been resolved.

    If you need assistance in filing your Certificate of Occupancy, contact us to start the process today.

    Read more...

SEARCH

CONTACT US
1000 characters left