The latest news on New York architecture.

  • Architects Preserving History

    Architects Preserving History

    What most people think architects do: imagine and draw.

    What architects really do: design and innovate.
     
    Many architects take it a step further and specialize. In New York City there are a number of full service architectural firms that could even be called historians because of their commitment to preserving architectural history.

    The Preservation Expertise

    Preservation is more than just restoring the integrity of a structure that has deteriorated over time. The artistry involved in preservation architecture endeavors to maintain the integrity of the historical significance of bygone construction methods. It is not enough for a building to appear as a copy of an original. The use of traditional building materials preserves the personality imbued within the structure by the original craftsmen from a particular moment in history.

    Why a Preservation Commitment Matters

    In 1965, the late Mayor Robert F. Wagner created the Landmarks Preservation Commission and the Landmarks Law to preserve historic landmarks and neighborhoods. Today thousands of buildings, historic interiors and even whole neighborhoods in all five boroughs happily exist under the law’s protection. In fact, 27% of Manhattan’s buildings have landmark status, all of which need architects with specific knowledge, experience and skill sets.

    A Record of Excellence

    If your historic structure is in need of restoration, place your confidence in an architectural firm wholly committed to historic preservation. Scott Henson Architect’s record of excellence can be seen in other New York City projects such as the Fleming Smith Warehouse, the Puck Building, the Franklin-Hudson Building, and the Eberhard Faber Pencil Factory just to name a few. To add your own building's name to such an illustrious list, please contact us.

    Read more...
  • A Brief History Of The Fleming Smith Warehouse

    A Brief History Of The Fleming Smith Warehouse

    Located on the lower west side of Manhattan, the Fleming Smith Warehouse is situated on the southeast corner of Washington and Watts Streets in the neighborhood now known as TriBeCa. Prior to its transformation into a commercial center during the mid-19th century, TriBeCa was among the first residential neighborhoods to develop beyond the boundaries of colonial New York City, with development beginning in the late 18th century.

    In 1891 Stephen Decatur Hatch, a prolific and respected architect who would go on to design such important structures as the Princeton Club (1891) and the Former New York Life Insurance Company Building (1895), was contracted by Fleming Smith to design the warehouse in an amalgamation of Romanesque Revival and neo-Flemish architectural styles. Neo-Flemish design elements were popular during this time period and often freely combined with features of other European architectural styles as a nod to Manhattan’s Dutch roots. It originally functioned as a shoe factory and a storehouse for wine.

    The most pronounced Romanesque elements of the Fleming Smith Warehouse façade are its rusticated stone base, segmental arches, and symmetrically grouped windows. The ground floor is characterized by roughly hewn stone: granite at the base with sandstone above, topped with a stone cornice.  The upper floors transition to yellow brick with red brick quoining at the corners with keyed enframements bordering each window grouping. The two upper floors are divided from the rest of the façade by an intricate sandstone water table.

    The Watts Street façade is characterized by a central, highly ornamental copper-trimmed gable flanked by two crow-stepped gables at each corner, intricate wrought iron balconies and two projecting dormer windows clad in decorative copper. The Washington Street façade is crowned with a fanciful copper-lined stepped central gable above a large segmental arched window flanked by two more projecting copper dormers.  The central gable is adorned with the initials “FS” and the date “1891,’ fabricated in copper.  The peaks of each dormer were once adorned with large decorative copper finials, duplicates of which are currently in the process of being fabricated and restored at all former locations. This Warehouse, with its handsome combination of architectural elements and its picturesque silhouette, is a visually striking building and enhances the commercial area surrounding it.

    In the late 1970’s, the Fleming Smith Warehouse became the first commercial building in TriBeCa to be converted for residential use. In 2005, a complete façade restoration was performed by Scott Henson Architects, LLC.

    If you own an historic building, please contact us to learn more about how we can assist you with repairs, restoration and preservation.

    Read more...

SEARCH

CONTACT US
1000 characters left