The latest news on New York architecture.

  • The project for 403 Greenwich Street may finally become a reality

    Nikolai Fedak reports for NY YIMBY: New Look: 403 Greenwich Street. YIMBY has a new set of renderings for the long-stalled project at 403 Greenwich Street, in Tribeca, where Morris Adjmi has designed an 8-story building. A tipster also notes that development of the site is finally about to begin, and the project has been sitting dormant since it went through the Landmarks Preservation Commission, back in 2011. The building is characterized by large casement windows and a black metal façade, and the overall look will be contextual within the project’s historic surrounds, offering a restrained exercise in refined simplicity. Permits indicate the structure will span 16,723 square feet, and the entirety will be residential, split between five units. While the building is relatively small, the (likely) condominiums will most assuredly be very large, with a triplex capping the project. 403 Greenwich was initially the site of a proposal for an all-glass-brick building, which would have been the first of its kind. While innovative, the scheme proved controversial as it traversed Landmarks, and the site’s eventuality will be a better fit. No completion date has been formally announced, but as mentioned, construction is likely around the corner. Permits list the developer as Anthony Coll of 403 Greenwich Street Realty LLC.  

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  • Proposed Preschool design for Fillmore Place, Williamsburg's only historic district

    Aaron Seward reports for The Architect's Newspaper: UNVEILED> THE SCHOOL AT FILLMORE PLACE. Christoff : Finio proposes a contemporary preschool for Williamsburg, Brooklyn's only landmarked block.

    New York City–based Christoff : Finio Architecture has released preliminary designs for a preschool set to rise on a tiny corner lot in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Known as The School at Fillmore Place, the three-story, 6,200-general-square-foot building’s design is derived from the Reggio Emilia philosophy of early childhood education, which posits that environment is an extremely important factor in learning.

    Due to the site’s small footprint, each floor of the building is large enough to house only a single classroom along with the vertical circulation to access it. As a result, every learning environment will have ample access to views of the surrounding neighborhood. A glass and timber-framed curtain wall with integrated wood panels and furniture—storage bins, display cases, tables—provides open sightlines, offering children many opportunities to see out into their world, and feel a part of it, while engaging in their classroom activities. The roof is occupied by an open play area and greenhouse.

            

    The project is currently going through Landmarks and Board of Standards and Appeals applications and will be further refined before construction begins. Located as it is in a designated historic district, the architecture has been designed to respond to its neighbors in massing and rhythm while providing a warm, contemporary expression.  

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