The latest news on New York architecture.

  • A Full-Service Architectural Firm Has What It Takes To Restore Your Buildings

    A Full-Service Architectural Firm Has What It Takes To Restore Your Buildings

    The nature of a full-service architectural firm is that the firm makes it their purpose to serve and guide every client from the start of the architectural process to the final conclusion of the construction.

    Within each phase of the architectural design process, including schematic design, design development, construction documents, bidding, and contract administration, certain goals will need to be met in order to reach project completion. The innovative process takes place between the client and the architect, including the builders, engineers, and anyone else who has a part to play in the project being a success.

    In order for this to be a dynamic process, there should be open communication and open feedback between all team members. There should also be technical and design experts who can contribute to the success of the project. In many ways, the role of an architect can be compared to a conductor because the architect is the one who ensures everything is in place in order to create a masterpiece.

    As a full-service architectural firm, we are here to represent you in the process of design and construction:

    • We will help you make the right decisions and address any problems that may arise.
    • We will make routine inspections and be on site to observe the construction and design progress.
    • We will also answer any questions you or the contractor may have before, during, and after construction.

    We want you to be able to navigate through the process of design and construction as easily as possible, and we believe that our full-service architectural firm has what it takes to repair, preserve, and restore your building.

    Contact Scott Henson Architect for more information.

    Read more...
  • Challenges in Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: The Armories of NYC

    Challenges in Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings: The Armories of NYC

    The world of adaptive reuse and historic preservation has found ways to successfully adapt and use historic buildings in modern neighborhoods. Social needs, such as for artist's housing, and needs for adaptive access, so all citizens can use the old buildings, have been successfully met. The old armories, however, have a number of challenges that are unique to their nature as urban fortresses.

    The armories were developed initially as the home fort for state militias, with room for storage of ammunition and weapons, room for drilling a company or more of soldiers, storage and living quarters, administrative offices, storage and management of provisions--all of the space needed to house, feed, and equip a fighting unit of soldiers. So the armories are huge, both large in interior space, many an entire block long, and built with the sturdiness of a building designed to protect armament. This massive scale, both in size and in the thickness and weight of the walls and other structural supports, is a challenge when adapting the spaces to other uses.

    The armories have mostly been in the ownership of the state, and as they were no longer needed for active military service, the state has ceded ownership over to the city. The city, having responsibility to provide some social services for their people, used the large spaces to provide homeless shelters and other social service needs. The grand scale of the buildings make them useful for a large-scale operation of this type, but neighborhoods have had difficulty when these needed but challenging uses impacted the quality of life in the neighborhood. In addition, there is some thought that the buildings, being designed as they were, should be prepped and available for citizens to use in the event of natural disasters. This potential use, while needed, is very expensive to maintain as space.

    Some armories are being studied to evaluate their feasibility to be adapted into mixed income housing. Like many of these projects, competing interests of neighborhood quality of life versus the need for affordable housing makes the conversation challenging.
    It will not be easy or cheap to adapt these massive military forts into uses for the modern day, with access for all and the systems that in modern life we need, such as HVAC, fire suppression systems, modern water catchment, sewage and plumbing. But their architecture is unique, and their scale and grandeur cannot be duplicated in modern times. To retain their uniqueness, we need to find suitable connections and interests between competing parties, and meet the challenge of adaptive reuse with innovative thinking.

    For more information on adaptive reuse and historic building preservation, please contact us.

    Read more...

SEARCH

CONTACT US
1000 characters left