The latest news on New York architecture.

  • Ignoring Building Envelope Repair Can Cost You

    Ignoring Building Envelope Repair Can Cost You

    If you have experienced leaks, mold, or excess dust in your building, you may need building envelope repair.  

    The building envelope is what protects the interior space from the elements and includes the building's roof, walls, windows, doors, and foundation. This outer shell protects a building's interior from water damage and outside air.

    Water leaking through a building envelope can cause expensive and dangerous damage. For instance, if water leaks through the roof or gets trapped in a wall, the standing water can rot the building's support beams and endanger their structural integrity. Wood rot can allow mold to grow, which in turn can aggravate allergies and smell bad.

    When air flow from outside is not controlled by the building envelope, the result is higher heating and cooling costs, as well as potential damage from dust and dirt. Variations in interior temperature can exacerbate water damage as well. For example, if the building's air conditioning system isn't able to keep the air cool and dry, mold may grow more quickly.

    Signs that you may need building envelope repair:

    • Leaks
    • Water stains or damage
    • Groaning, spongy floors
    • Moldy or musty odor
    • Peeling wallpaper or paint

    The longer you ignore the signs, the more you will pay for repairs.

    We specialize in restoration and repair of New York City building envelopes. Because this work is most often completed while a building is occupied and open for business, it's important to work with a contractor that is sensitive to your needs. We work with building owners to complete these important repairs without disrupting day-to-day operations, either during off-hours or on an accelerated schedule.

    Contact us to schedule a consultation.

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  • Interior Architecture in Adaptive Reuse

    Interior Architecture in Adaptive Reuse

    When you think of architecture, city skylines probably come to mind - the exterior appearance of buildings is what people usually associate with an architect's work.  However, there is another side of the field: interior architecture

    Not to be confused with interior decorating, interior designers or architects design interior space that is bound by existing structures (walls, beams, doors) and equally restricted by human interaction (how people will use the space).  

    Interior architects need a working knowledge of a wide range of subjects:

    • Building code
    • Structural integrity
    • Ergonomics and spatial concepts
    • CAD drawing
    • Design history

    Interior architects work not only with home- or building-owners, but also with government agencies and builders.  In other words, interior architecture is design for living/working space in architectural rather than decorative terms. 

    There are two types of interior architecture, the initial design/usage plan and adaptive reuse, or the redesign of an existing space to serve a new purpose.  According to Wikipedia:

    Adaptive reuse refers to the process of reusing an old site or building for a purpose other than which it was built or designed for. It can be regarded as a compromise between historic preservation and demolition.

    One example of our interior architecture work on an adaptive reuse project is 11 West 20th Street.  Built in 1901 as a store, we have been working on the exterior and interior renovations since 2007.  Our interior work has included renovating the third floor; repairing damaged masonry; and replacing the building’s historic windows with new thermally insulated windows.

    If you are in need of interior architecture services, contact us for a consultation.

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